Here are 20 remarkable Brain facts not known by many people

But how much do we know about our own BRAIN : Image

The brain is the crown gem of the human body. It is the seat of intelligence, interpreter of the senses, initiator of body movement, and controller of behavior. The human brain is the most complex organ of the body, and arguably the most complex thing on earth. But how much do we know about our own BRAIN

How many brain cells are in your brain?

The average adult human brain has about 100 billion cells.  It’s still a mystery exactly how these connections work together to create all the marvels of our brains.

Longest living cells in the body

The longest living cells in the body prize goes to brain cells. Most of our brain cells stay  from birth to death. The wiring of these cells changes constantly through our lives.

Water, Water everywhere

Brain is made up of 73% water. 2% dehydration is enough to affect attention, memory and other cognitive skills

Brain feels no PAIN

Brain  do not have any pain receptors. Hence surgeons can perform brain surgery while you are awake. The pain experienced with headache/migraine is because of  the pain receptors present in  layers of coverings, blood vessels, the scalp and some muscles that surrounds the brain.

Brain Loves Cholesterol

Twenty-five percent of the body’s cholesterol resides within the brain. Without proper supply of cholesterol, brain cells die.

Brain is always THINKING

The brain on an average is believed to generate around 50,000 thoughts per day. Sad part is that, in most people 70% of these thoughts are negative. 

Human brain is not SOLID

The human brain is neither solid, nor liquid. It’s soft and squishy similar to the consistency of soft tofu or soft gelatin. And it’s very fragile.

We have a second brain too

The human brain is the most complex organ of the body, and arguably the most complex thing on earth

The brain in your head is not the only brain. There’s a second brain” that lies in intestines that contains around 100 million neurons

Brain generates enough electricity to power a 25-watt light bulb

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Did you know that what’s going on in your Gut could affect your Brain

“Brain that stays in Gut” is giving a new dimension to our understanding of digestion, mood, health and disease onset.

Why do we stop eating food when we are full ?

Why do we feel sick or get vomiting sensation on the morning of an important exam ?

Stressed or Anxious, one feel butterflies in stomach. Feeling nervous or going through nerve wrenching moment, stomach growls and rumbles. Well – thoughts happen in brain, but stomach acts. The gastrointestinal tract is sensitive to emotion.  Anger, anxiety, sadness, elation — all of these feelings  can trigger symptoms in the gut. It’s  just not the troubled brain can send signals to the gut, but gut too sends signal back to brain. Scientists were shocked to learn that about 90 percent of the fibers in the primary visceral nerve, the vagus, carry information from the gut to the brain and not the other way around. Vagus nerve, originates with the dorsal motor nucleus in the medulla and extends through the abdomen to the viscera.

Gut Our Second Brain

Gut Our Second Brain

Our Gut has its own branch of the nervous system called the enteric nervous system that can function on its own, even if it is disconnected from the brain. The enteric nervous system, the second brain consists of sheaths of neurons embedded in the walls of the long tube of our gut.  The second brain contains some 100 million neurons, more than in either the spinal cord or the peripheral nervous system. It actually arises from the same tissues as our central nervous system (CNS) during fetal development.  The ENS supervises the processes of digestion and stays in close contact with, and is heavily influenced by, the central nervous system (the CNS) which comprises the brain and spinal cord. The ENS and CNS also use many of the same chemical messengers or neurotransmitters including acetylcholine and serotonin.

 “Brain that stays in Gut” is giving a new dimension to our understanding of digestion, mood, health and disease onset. 

” Our two brains — the one in our head and the one in our bowel — must cooperate. If they do not, then there is chaos in the gut and misery in the head — everything from “butterflies” to cramps, from diarrhea to constipation.”–  Dr. Michael Gershon

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Why do women crave chocolate so much

Women tend to desire chocolate much more than men

Women desire chocolate much more than men. Women crave chocolate, and approximately half of the cravers crave it specifically around the onset of menstruation. Chocolate cravings appear to exist in 40% of females and 15% of males, three fourths of whom claim that no other substance will appease their desire.

Chocolate affect the brain, leading to an increase in neurotransmitters and dopamine and a feeling of happiness sets in. Chocolate increases serotonin in the brain, a neurotransmitter responsible for better mood, sleep, and reduction of anxiety.  Women have a natural decrease in serotonin in the brain in the week before menstruation, so this may partially explain the specific craving for chocolate during this time.

Chocolate affects the brain of women in a different way. The brain of some men and women were scanned using MRI and it was found that chocolate affected the activity of the amygdala more in the brain of women. The Amygdala is a part of the brain that can affect emotions and sexual desire.

Scientists have speculated that chocolate consumption may be even motivated by magnesium deficiency, especially because magnesium deficiency is associated with premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Chocolate and cocoa powder both contain exceptionally high concentrations of this nutrient.

What make women chocolate addict

What make women chocolate addict

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Pigeons are not that dumb !

Pigeons can read

Study suggests that pigeons can recognize words. Pigeons also known as “rats with wings” just might be literate.

“Although their brains are only the size of a thimble, pigeons apparently have similar levels of intelligence as those found in toddlers. Earlier studies have shown they can tell the difference between live video images of themselves and previously recorded images. This ability is higher than the average human three-year-old.”

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